<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
    <title></title>
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#ffffff">
    On 3/30/2011 08:27, Brian Long wrote:
    <blockquote
      cite="mid:AANLkTikGZhUEtt9dwHY81oEwgpqhSjtoZBe4FRTiUGig@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Mar 29, 2011 at 3:07 PM, Raymond
        Wagner <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a moz-do-not-send="true"
            href="mailto:raymond@wagnerrp.com">raymond@wagnerrp.com</a>&gt;</span>
        wrote:<br>
        <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt
          0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204);
          padding-left: 1ex;">
          <br>
          The Atom processor is the perfect example of the wrong product
          at the<br>
          right time. &nbsp;Netbooks had just started coming out, and while
          some ran<br>
          Linux, most people wanted to stick with Windows, which
          requires an x86<br>
          processor. &nbsp;The ULV mobile processors are considerably higher<br>
          performance than the Atoms while in the same power envelope,
          but due to<br>
          all the crap Intel ripped out of the design, the Atoms were
          low<br>
          transistor count and dirt cheap to manufacture. &nbsp;ARMs at the
          time had<br>
          similar performance, with a small fraction of the power
          consumption, but<br>
          since they couldn't run Windows, the Atom won out. &nbsp;Windows 8
          is<br>
          expected out sometime next year with ARM support. &nbsp;I don't
          expect the<br>
          Atom line to survive much beyond that.<br>
        </blockquote>
        <div><br>
          It appears some companies are betting the farm on Atom
          surviving a little longer:<br>
          <a moz-do-not-send="true"
            href="http://www.seamicro.com/?q=node/38">http://www.seamicro.com/?q=node/38</a><br>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    Seamicro is only riding the existing PR with that one.&nbsp; As
    mentioned, the ARMs have about as much integer performance as the
    Atom, at a fraction of the power consumption and cost.&nbsp; While the
    ARMs have poor floating point performance, the Atoms aren't
    especially good at that either.<br>
    <br>
    So let's look at this thing.&nbsp; 512 1.66GHz cores in a 10U chassis,
    replacing 40U of traditional server.&nbsp; Now a traditional server
    processor is going to do around 3-4 times the work per core as these
    Atoms, and since you can stuff 32 cores into a 2U server, you're
    looking at the same 8-12U of equipment as this thing, not the 40U
    they claim.<br>
    <br>
    Now what about price?&nbsp; That 2U chassis with 8 quad core 2.93GHz
    Xeons, 192GB of memory, and 12 500GB drives is going to run just
    under $10K.&nbsp; For somewhere between $40K-$60K, you can build an
    equivalent traditional server system to that Seamicro box.&nbsp; The
    Seamicro box costs $150K.<br>
    <br>
    Now what about power consumption?&nbsp; That 2U chassis is going to eat
    up around 1kW under full load, or maybe half that while idle.&nbsp; While
    each of those 256 Atoms is only going to consume around 8W each,
    figure double that when the memory and chipset is taken into
    account.&nbsp; That puts it at maybe 4kW for the whole system under full
    load.&nbsp; Now here's the problem, those desktop Atom chips don't really
    idle.&nbsp; One of the things Intel ripped out in the name of cheapness
    was the clock stepping and power gating.&nbsp; That Atom will consume
    less power under load, but more power while idle, than the
    traditional server.&nbsp; Surely for one third the price, that 20% less
    power consumption under load is not something you would be all that
    concerned about.<br>
    <br>
    What other concerns are there with going with that Atom solution?&nbsp;
    First, you have software licensing.&nbsp; Commercial server software
    often charges per processor or per core.&nbsp; Often times the software
    costs considerably more than the server, meaning it's advantageous
    to get the power powerful per thread system you can.&nbsp; The Atoms lose
    out big time here.&nbsp; Next, you have inter-connectivity.&nbsp; The Atom
    will have 64 gigabit ethernet ports, compared to the traditional
    server's 40.&nbsp; With typical web serving applications, that's plenty.&nbsp;
    For most HPC applications, that's inadequate, and you're going to
    want something fast with low latency.&nbsp; To get infiniband, you're
    looking at an extra $15K for 20 ports on the traditional server,
    plus another $10K for a switch to handle them.&nbsp; For the Atoms, it's
    simply not an option and you're out of luck.<br>
  </body>
</html>