<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div class="im"><br>
</div>Yes, they also have a strange interpretation of the GPL saying that you<br>
can&#39;t remove their logos and menu entries.<br>
<font color="#888888"></font></blockquote><div><br>May I suggest that a suitable solution to the logo issue is to quote the 2nd freedom of the GPL, which states you have &quot;the freedom to change the software to suit your needs&quot;. <br>

<br><a href="http://www.fsf.org/licensing/licenses/quick-guide-gplv3.html">http://www.fsf.org/licensing/licenses/quick-guide-gplv3.html</a> <br></div></div><br>It may be that someone&#39;s &quot;needs&quot; on this list specifically exclude any logos and/or undesirable menu options.   If they then choose to &quot;convey&quot; ( the GPLv3 term), or &quot;distribute&quot; ( the equivalent GPLv2 term) the changes they did to the software by providing it in such a manner as a publically available online media ( eg SVN repository ) , then they are 100% compliant with the GPLv3, so long as they  &quot;place his or her
name on it, to distinguish it from other versions and to protect the
reputations of other maintainers.&quot;  ( <a href="http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#WhyDoesTheGPLPermitUsersToPublishTheirModifiedVersions">http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.html#WhyDoesTheGPLPermitUsersToPublishTheirModifiedVersions</a> ) .<br>

<br>So essentially, feel free to remove logos and undesirables, so long as the modified version clearly states somewhere ( eg in the code) that this is a &quot;modified version&quot; or similar, and who the original author/s are, etc.<br>

<br>Buzz.<br>IANAL.   But I know *my* rights with regard to the GPLv3, and other people logos aren&#39;t in my interest. :-)<br><br><br><br>