<div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Apr 14, 2008 at 7:26 PM, Guido Grazioli &lt;<a href="mailto:guido.grazioli@gmail.com">guido.grazioli@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid">2008/4/7 Stuart Morgan &lt;<a href="mailto:stuart@tase.co.uk">stuart@tase.co.uk</a>&gt;:<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br><br>&gt; &nbsp;The question of whether it&#39;s theft at all to use this information for personal<br>&gt; use is pretty clear and I think copyright law around the world agrees on this<br>&gt; issue. You rent a DVD and copy it for personal use - theft. You borrow a book<br>
&gt; from the library and copy the whole thing - theft. A webpage is no different<br>&gt; and though your browser may cache a copy for speed reasons, it is expected<br>&gt; that the cache is temporary and that the page remains unmodified.<br>
<br></div>I think you are getting a bit too strong here, if copying a DVD or a<br>book is theft,<br>mirroring a complete website would be similar, but scaping a webpage would just<br>be like going to the library and take some notes from a book<br>
<br>Think of xmltv, where many grabbers are scaping directly the xml data used<br>for ajax webpages; they cannot disallow me to access those files without ads<br>instead of the full graphics page</blockquote>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>It really matters very little what we all like to think it should work vs. how the TOS of the sites say it works.&nbsp; They say it&#39;s not allowed so it&#39;s not allowed.&nbsp; </div>
<div>&nbsp;</div>
<div>Kevin</div></div>